Europe’s Supply Chain Finance Fix Feeds Hidden Debt Fears | Investing News

By Abhinav Ramnarayan and Lawrence White

LONDON (Reuters) – European companies hit by the coronavirus crisis are increasingly turning to a complex financial tool to pay suppliers, raising investor concerns around “hidden” debt.

Supply chain financing, by which companies can get cash from banks and funds to pay their suppliers without using working capital, has likely hit a record high in 2020, data shows.

The world’s top banks are set to earn $27 billion from financing supply chains this year, data from research firm Coalition shows, as larger borrowers, mostly in Europe, scramble to help suppliers hammered by the pandemic.

This represents a rise of about 5.5% in 2020, compared with an average 2% increase in the previous four years.

While supply chain finance is a legitimate business tool, high-profile collapses of companies like Britain’s Carillion, Spain’s Abengoa and the United Arab Emirates’ NMC Health have prompted investor concern.

“Supply

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We need compliant decentralized finance

The crypto space is an incredible, albeit risky, learning environment. Its volatility serves as a dire warning to those who like to test how deep the pool is by jumping in headfirst. Old guards constantly warn newcomers: “Take it slow, learn the basics and stack sats.” Wealth, in this space, can appear and disappear in an instant.

In 2018, many newcomers got their first taste of what a crypto winter feels like. This wasn’t the first time Bitcoin (BTC) crashed, and it won’t be the last.

Despite being around for more than 10 years, the crypto space is still in its infancy; the technology advances so quickly that every year we get to experiment with new concepts, new ideas, new applications and new ways to change the face of the world.

Related: Financial literacy will make the digital asset industry sustainable for the future

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Your guide to eight years of finance leaks

The latest leak is of files sent to FinCEN, part of the US Treasury
The latest leak is of files sent to FinCEN, part of the US Treasury

The FinCEN Files are another big leak of secret files, detailing the failure of major global banks to stop money laundering and financial crime. They also expose how the UK is often the weak link in the financial system and how London is awash with Russian cash.

The files include more than 2,000 suspicious activity reports (SARs), filed by financial institutions to the Financial Crimes Enforcement Agency, or FinCEN, a part of the US Treasury Department. They also include 17,641 records obtained through Freedom of Information (FOI) requests and other sources.

They were obtained by BuzzFeed News which shared them with the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists (ICIJ) and 400 journalists around the world. Panorama has led research for the BBC.

The files are the latest in a series of whistleblowing-led investigations that have rocked the

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Founder of London Capital & Finance marketer Surge targets poor for rentals

The founder of Surge Financial, the marketing company responsible for putting thousands of investors into London Capital & Finance and Blackmore Bonds before they collapsed, is now running a business charging poor people high prices for rent-to-own household goods.

Kerry Venn was chief operating officer at Surge, which used sophisticated marketing techniques on social media and Google to target sales literature often at elderly customers who now face the loss of most of their savings with the firms.

She worked closely alongside Paul Careless, who later ran Surge and was arrested last year pending investigation into the collapse of LCF.

Careless denies any wrongdoing. Surge did not handle client money and was not involved in the investment decisions made by LCF and Blackmore.

Venn and her husband are now operating a business called YesYouCan, which charges more than double the retail value of items such as vacuum cleaners and washing

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