Ex-Olympic ice skater charged with scamming US government out of $1.5 million in Covid relief money

<p>Luka Klasinc, a former Olympic ice skater, has been arrested and charged with fraud</p> (Getty)

Luka Klasinc, a former Olympic ice skater, has been arrested and charged with fraud

(Getty)

A former Olympic ice skater has been charged with defrauding the United States government of $1.5 million, the Department of Justice announced on Tuesday.

The Manhattan US Attorney’s Office says Luka Klasinc, who competed for Slovenia at the 1992 Winter Olympics, took advantage of a program meant to help small businesses hit hard by the coronavirus crisis.

“As alleged, at a time when US small businesses were struggling because of the COVID-19 pandemic, Klasinc thought he could scam his way to easy money,” Manhattan US Attorney Audrey Strauss said in a statement.

By falsifying documents and misrepresenting his finances, the US Attorney says, Mr Klasinc bilked the US Small Business Administration out of $1,595,800 – until he got caught.

“As alleged, Klasinc used false documents to try and obtain over a million dollars in

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